New NGEF Staff Has Guard Roots

Family roots in the Maryland militia spurred the newest National Guard Educational Foundation staffer’s interest in the National Guard.

Ryan Trainor, 28, started today as the National Guard Memorial Museum’s archivist and museum specialist. He will focus on creating and researching exhibits, developing the archives, giving tours of the museum and implementing a collection development policy for the library.

Though he is a new staff member, Trainor is a familiar face in the NGAUS building. He has been the museum’s library intern since August 2013.

Trainor is from Hampstead, Md., and was inspired to apply to the internship after a discovery he made two years ago while researching his lineage for Sons of the American Revolution membership. He found out that his 5th great-grandfather was a lieutenant in the militia from Frederick County, Md.

“I was really interested that there was a library and archives and museum that was dedicated to sharing the heritage and traditions of the National Guard,” he says. “It personally resonated with me.”

Trainor starts at NGEF on the heels of another milestone. He graduated Friday from the University of Maryland with a master’s degree in library science. He completed his undergraduate studies at Loyola University where he received a bachelor’s degree in history.

Asked what excites him most about joining NGEF, Trainor doesn’t hesitate.

The history buff says he wants to keep telling the Guard story, “bring my family’s personal story to life and be able to bring that same passion to others who visit the museum.”

NGAUS/NGEF Delegation Travels to Normandy for 70th Anniversary of D-Day

On June 2, 2014, a delegation from NGAUS will leave for Normandy to take part in the anniversary ceremonies in recognition of the 70th Anniversary of the allied forces’ landing on the beaches of northern France, D-Day, June 6, 1944.

That dark, blustery morning, the soldiers of the 29th Infantry Division (Md., Va. and D.C.) came ashore under tremendous fire from the German artillery embedded in the beach head.

One of those beach heads today is home to the NGAUS Monument dedicated to the memory of all National Guardsmen who gave their lives on D-Day as well as throughout both World Wars I and II.

Our delegation, including Maj. Gen. Steve Danner, the NGAUS chairman, and Maj. Gen. R. Martin Umbarger, a National Guard Educational Foundation board member, will take part in a full day of activities on June 6.  Starting with a sunrise ceremony on Omaha Beach honoring the 29th Infantry Division, followed by attendance at the American Cemetery in Coleville-sur-Mer and ending with a ceremony at the NGAUS Monument itself — the delegation will be steeped in the history and legacy of National Guard service on that fateful day.  Other dignitaries at the American Cemetery include U.S. President Barack Obama, Queen Elizabeth II, French President Francois Hollande and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

On June 7, the delegation will travel around various sites including Ponte-du-Hoc, the Peregory Monument and, finally, St. Lo.

NGAUS and NGEF are delighted to send over a small, dedicated group of representatives to this significant event.

List of Large NGEF Donors Increases

A technology company, a military vehicle manufacturer and a real estate company were among the donors recognized Saturday in a ceremony at the National Guard Memorial, the NGAUS headquarters in Washington, D.C. The ceremony followed the meeting of the NGAUS board of directors.

The nine donors honored contributed a total of $105,000 to the National Guard Educational Foundation and were welcomed as members of the Legion de Lafayette following a meeting of the association’s board of directors. The Legion de Lafayette is an organization reserved for the largest donors to NGEF.

“We continue to be extremely humbled by the generous support of so many individuals, companies and organizations that share our mission to tell the story of the National Guard,” said Luke Guthrie, the NGAUS director of membership, marketing and development.

The donors recognized at the ceremony were:

ACC Health; AM General; Beechcraft; Donohoe Real Estate Services; LORD Corporation; Military Personnel Services Corporation; Onsite Health; Peduzzi Associates, Ltd.; and Rocky Brands.

The foundation was established in 1975 to spread the history of the National Guard. NGEF runs the National Guard Memorial Museum and the library, which is home to more than 6,000 volumes and documents that speak to the militia history of the United States.

Among those attending the ceremony were Gen. Frank J. Grass, the chief of the National Guard Bureau, and Lt. Gen. Stanley Clarke, the director of the Air National Guard.

 

Edward J. Philbin, Former NGAUS Boss, Dies

A former NGAUS chief executive officer best known for his clashes with the Pentagon in the 1990s has passed away. Retired Maj. Gen. Edward J. Philbin, who was the NGAUS executive director (now president) from June 1, 1995, through the end of 1998, died Jan. 12 in Colorado. He was 81.

Philbin’s term at the association was marked by pitched battles over the way ahead for both NGAUS and the National Guard.

He inherited the fiscal challenges caused by the initial high debt service on the National Guard Memorial, the NGAUS headquarters in Washington, D.C. His immediate response was to slash association spending and push for a dues increase.

The twin actions, while not popular with many members, triggered the recovery that culminated last summer in NGAUS paying off the mortgage on the building.

Philbin was also instrumental in the association turning back several Army attempts to cut the Guard, including a 1997 scheme to slash Army Guard end strength by 45,000 troops.

His mantra was to never let any attack on the Guard go without a response.

The general’s tenure at NGAUS capped decades of public service. His military career began in 1949 when he enlisted in the Naval Air Reserve and ended with his retirement in 1992 after he spent four years as the commander of the New Jersey Air Guard.

He also served three presidents in positions requiring Senate confirmation, including four years (1981 to 1984) as deputy assistant secretary of defense for reserve affairs.

“General Philbin never shied from a fight,” said retired Maj. Gen. Gus Hargett, the NGAUS president. “As a result, the National Guard had the troop strength to support the war on terrorism and our association still has our beautiful headquarters building.

“Our force, our association and our nation will forever be in his debt.”

Philbin will be laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery March 24. A visitation is set for the day before from 4 to 10 p.m. at the Murphy Funeral Home, 4510 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, Va.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests charitable donations to the National Guard Educational Foundation, One Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001.

NGEF Organizes Guard Birthday Bash

National Guard leaders, members of Congress, congressional staff and others gathered last week to celebrate the National Guard’s 377th birthday during a reception on Capitol Hill. Held Wednesday in the Gold Room of the Rayburn House Office Building, the event sponsored by the National Guard Educational Foundation was an early celebration. The actual birthday was Friday.

The birthday marks the day that the first militia units were formed by the Massachusetts Bay Colony legislature. Three units were required by the state government to report to duty and defend the colony. Now, according to Guard officials, an average of 3,000 Guardsmen are on duty each day.

Approximately 300 people heard from Maj. Gen. Steve Danner, the NGAUS chairman, Gen. Frank J. Grass, the chief of the National Guard Bureau, Chief Master Sgt. Mitchell Brush, the senior enlisted advisor to Grass, and Rep. Peter Visclosky, D-Ind.

See photos on the NGAUS Flickr page at http://www.flickr.com/photos/48510441@N06/.

Danner thanked the men and women of the Guard for their service, and got a round of applause when he noted that NGAUS is debt free after paying off the mortgage to the National Guard Memorial this year.

Grass mentioned what he says are the three central missions of the National Guard—the war fight, homeland support and building partnerships. He noted that this is the 20th anniversary of the State Partnership Program and the 21st anniversary of the Youth ChalleNGe program. Both help build Guard ties with communities at home and overseas.

Grass also thanked the adjutants general for their support. The TAGs, many of whom were in town to meet with senior Guard leadership this week, do a great job “recruiting, training and keeping” quality Guardsmen, he said.

The crowd had a chance to meet a few of those quality troops when Brush introduced the National Guard’s soldiers and airmen of the year. Brush said the group not only stood out individually, but represented the caliber of men and women serving in the Guard across the country.

Visclosky returned to the State Partnership Program, saying it was especially important for the Guard to pass along its ideals and traditions in countries where communism once flourished and where the military does not adhere to human rights. The Guard, he said, shows them a better way.

The cake was provided by Sabre Systems, Inc. Other sponsors making the event possible were AM General, Boeing, Cobham, Grantham University, Hendrick Motorsports, Humana Military Healthcare Services, Jacobs, Lockheed Martin, LORD Corporation, Raydon, Saab Defense and Security USA, LLC, Sikorsky Aircraft, Textron, Thomas Edison State College and Transhield.

 

NGEF Organizes Capitol Hill Bash for National Guard’s Birthday

National Guard leaders, members of Congress, congressional staff and others gathered Wednesday evening to celebrate the National Guard’s 377th birthday during a reception on Capitol Hill. Held in the Gold Room of the Rayburn House Office Building, the event sponsored by the National Guard Educational Foundation was an early celebration. The actual birthday is Friday. Click here to see photos.

The birthday marks the day that the first militia units were formed by the Massachusetts Bay Colony legislature. Three units were required by the state government to report to duty and defend the colony. Now, according to Guard officials, an average of 3,000 Guardsmen are on duty each day.

Approximately 300 people heard from Maj. Gen. Steve Danner, the NGAUS chairman, Gen. Frank J. Grass, the chief of the National Guard Bureau, Command Chief Master Sgt. Mitch Brush, the Guard’s senior enlisted member, and Rep. Peter Visclosky, D-Ind.

Danner thanked the men and women of the Guard for their service, and got a round of applause when he noted that NGAUS is debt free after paying off the mortgage to the National Guard Memorial this year.

Grass mentioned what he says are the three central missions of the National Guard—the war fight, homeland support and building partnerships. He noted that this is the 20th anniversary of the State Partnership Program and the 21st anniversary of the Youth ChalleNGe program. Both help build Guard ties with communities at home and overseas.

Grass also thanked the adjutants general for their support. The TAGs, many of whom were in town to meet with senior Guard leadership this week, do a great job “recruiting, training and keeping” quality Guardsmen, he said.

The crowd had a chance to meet a few of those quality troops when Brush introduced the National Guard’s soldiers and airmen of the year. Brush said the group not only stood out individually, but represented the caliber of men and women serving in the Guard across the country.

Visclosky returned to the State Partnership Program, saying it was especially important for the Guard to pass along its ideals and traditions in countries where communism once flourished and where the military does not adhere to human rights. The Guard, he said, shows them.

– See more at: http://www.ngaus.org/newsroom/news/ngef-organizes-capitol-hill-bash-national-guards-birthday

Legion de Lafayette Welcomes New Members

Defense companies, a university, individuals and a state National Guard association were among the donors recognized Saturday in a ceremony at the National Guard Memorial, the NGAUS headquarters in Washington, D.C.

The list of donors included the NGAUS chairman and his wife.

The donors contributed a total of $185,000 to the National Guard Educational Foundation and were honored as members of the Legion de Lafayette following a meeting of the association’s board of directors. The Legion de Lafayette is an organization reserved for the largest donors to NGEF.

“Once again, we are grateful for the generosity of those who value the work of NGEF and are willing to demonstrate it,” said Luke Guthrie, the NGAUS director of membership, marketing and development.

NGEF was established in 1975 to tell the story of the National Guard. It operates the National Guard Memorial Museum and the library, which holds more than 6,000 volumes and documents related to the militia history of the United States.

Among those attending the ceremony were Gen. Frank J. Grass, the chief of the National Guard Bureau, and Lt. Gen. Joseph L. Lengyel, the vice chief of the National Guard Bureau.

The donors recognized at the ceremony were:

Affinity eSolutions Inc.; Ashford University; Big Ass Fans; Brede Allied Convention Services; CALCULEX, Inc.; Cobham; DRS Technologies; Laser Shot; LiteFighter Systems, LLC; National Guard Youth Foundation; Nevada National Guard Association; Northrop Grumman; Raydon; Sikorsky; USAA; George G. Demetriades Jr.; retired Lt. Col. Kenneth Godin; retired Col. Benjamin Lucas II; and Maj. Gen. Steve Danner, the NGAUS chairman, and his wife, Kathleen.

Museum Asking for World War II Artifacts

The National Guard Educational Foundation is seeking artifacts related to the National Guard from the World War II era. The items will be part of NGEF’s planned renovation of the gallery dedicated to that war in the National Guard Memorial Museum.

The museum is hoping to receive a variety of items, such as uniforms, equipment, mementos, documents and photos that will allow the museum to better tell the story of the Guard’s involvement in the war, said Amelia Meyer, the museum curator.

“We encourage any Guard veterans, relatives of Guardsmen who served during the war, collectors and others to contact us regarding donations to the museum,” Meyer said. “We envision a gallery that encapsulates the Guard’s importance to the combat effort abroad and that also recognizes the Guard’s overall contributions to the Allied victory.”

Meyer can be contacted at amelia.meyer@ngaus.org.

 

Shutdown Boosts Guard Museum Visitors

The partial shutdown of the government has been a bonanza for the National Guard Memorial Museum inside the NGAUS headquarters in Washington, D.C.

With many federally funded museums shuttered, the museum operated by the National Guard Educational Foundation has seen a dramatic rise in visitors.

“We’re happy to accommodate the people who came to the nation’s capital to learn about the country,” said Anne Armstrong, the deputy director of NGEF. “We may not have been on their original agenda, but I think most of them have gone away satisfied they had accomplished their goal.”

Armstrong said 150 students from the National Youth Leadership Forum toured the museum Thursday. Fifty of them were scheduled to visit the National Guard Memorial, but the other 100 came when museums they had planned to tour were closed.

Armstrong said she sent the students through the NGEF museum in 50-student “waves” that lasted from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. The group wants to send another 45 to the museum this week.

On Friday, 50 students and 10 chaperones from the Florida Academy turned up when they couldn’t visit the Smithsonian facilities. Armstrong said 114 students from the Eastwood and Northview middle schools in Indianapolis have asked to tour the museum Wednesday.

“It’s too bad the shutdown has closed the city’s wonderful museums to these visitors,” Armstrong said, “but we offer a quality educational experience for anyone who takes the time to tour our galleries.”

NGEF Wins in Rain-Shortened Golf Tourney

More than 100 golfers tried but were unable to complete a round of 18 holes Monday at the 15th Annual National Guard Educational Foundation Fundraiser Golf Tournament at Laurel Hill Golf Club in Lorton, Va.

Despite the rain, the event was a success as donations and a raffle put more than $25,000 in the coffers of NGEF, which educates the public and Guard members about the force. NGEF operates the National Guard Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., and a library with more than 4,000 volumes.

“The weather didn’t cooperate, but our partners and friends certainly did,” said Luke Guthrie, the NGAUS director of membership, marketing and development. “We can only thank those who showed up for their support and their understanding as the golf they hoped to play was washed away. We’ll try for better weather next year.”

The shotgun “captain’s choice” scramble began at 10 a.m. The rain held off as golfers started the round with overcast skies and cool winds.

The course was in fine shape as it recently hosted the U.S. Amateur Public Links Championship sanctioned by the United States Golf Association. Unfortunately, after the first golfers reached the sixth hole, the rain started and continued without a break for about six hours.

During the raffle, participants bid on items autographed items by members of the Washington Redskins and Washington Nationals, as well as golf clubs and gift certificates donated by generous sponsors.

The tournament will return to Laurel Hill next year at a date yet to be determined.